Taste Washington Day

**TASTE WASHINGTON DAY IS AN ANNUAL CELEBRATION OF WASHINGTON GROWN FOODS SERVED IN SCHOOL MEALS DURING THE FALL HARVEST SEASON. SCHOOLS CONNECT WITH LOCAL FARMS TO MAKE THE MOST OF OUR BOUNTIFUL FALL HARVEST, AND USE TASTE WASHINGTON DAY TO KICK OFF FARM TO SCHOOL MONTH IN OCTOBER. THIS YEAR ON OCTOBER 7, WE WILL BE FEATURING LOCALLY GROWN APPLES. THE FOLLOWING ARE SOME FUN FACTS ABOUT APPLES:

  • Apples are a member of the rose family of plants, along with pears, peaches, plums and cherries.

  • The science of growing apples is called pomology.

  • Apples come in all shades of red, green and yellow.

  • Most apples are still picked by hand.

  • It takes about 36 apples to create one gallon of apple cider.

  • 25 percent of an apple's volume is air; that is why they float.

  • It takes the energy from 50 leaves to produce one apple.

  • A peck of apples weighs 10.5 pounds.

  • A bushel of apples weighs 42 pounds, and will yield 20-24 quarts of applesauce

  • There are more than 2,500 varieties of apples grown in the United States.

  • Apples are a good source of fiber.

  • A large apple tree can take 8 to 10 years to produce it's first fruit, a small tree usually 3 to 5 years.

  • The larges U.S. apple crop was 277.3 million bushels, harvested in 1998.

  • Apple trees can be grown farther north than other fruit trees because they bloom late in spring, minimizing the chance of frost damage.

  • The largest apple to be picked weighed three pounds.