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Meal Prices for 2020-2021
Preschool-5 Breakfast - Free
Preschool-5 Lunch - Free
6-12 Breakfast - $1.75
6-12 Reduced Breakfast - Free
6-12 Lunch - $2.85
6-12 Reduced Lunch - $.40
Adult Breakfast - $2.50
Adult Lunch - $4.00

FREE & REDUCED-PRICE INFORMATION

POLICY INFORMATION

NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH & BREAKFAST PROGRAM

Apple Facts

Recipe for Applesauce

Applesauce will vary in texture and flavor depending on the variety of apple used. All-purpose apples such as Granny Smith, Rome Beauty, Fuji and Jonagold (as well as many others) produce good results.

8 large apples, peeled, cored and cut into thick slices
1/2 cup water
2 lemon slices
1/2 cup sugar
1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

Combine apples, water and lemon slices in a large saucepan. Simmer, uncovered for 10 minutes or until apples are part sauce and with some chunks of apple left. Watch closely and stir often to prevent burning. Applesauce should be thick; add more water if necessary. Leave sauce chunky or put apples and lemons through a food mill or coarse sieve. Stir in sugar to desired sweetness. Add cinnamon and nutmeg. Serve warm or chilled. Cover and refrigerate leftovers for up to one week. Yield 5 to 6 cups.

To make unsweetened applesauce: omit added sugar and select a naturally sweet variety such as Golden Delicious, Red Delicious or Gala.

To Freeze: Increase spices to twice the indicated amount, as they lose flavor during freezing. Refrigerate until chilled. Pack cool applesauce into rigid freezer containers to within 1/2-inch from the top and seal. Use a container size suitable for your family's needs. To use: thaw in the refrigerator overnight or in cold water for 3 hours. Can be frozen for up to one year at 0°F.

To Can: Pack hot applesauce into clean standard canning jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Seal with 2 piece canning lid and screw band. Process jars for 10 minutes in a boiling water bath. Remove jars, cool, check seals, label and date. Store sealed jars away from sunlight in a cool, dry place for up to one year.

WELCOME TO THE DAYTON SCHOOL DISTRICT FOOD SERVICES DEPARTMENT

Lunch Tray

SFSP Program Extended through December 31, 2020


Free Meals to ALL Children 18 and Under through December 31, 2020

USDA has extended the free meals for kids program though December 31, 2020. Any child, 18 and under, regardless of enrollment in the school district, is eligible to receive meals at no cost. Meals can be picked up between 11:00 - 11:20 a.m. in the elementary bus drop off area off of 2nd St. Meals are available Monday through Friday with the exception on non-school days. To ensure the availability of meals please contact Jana Eaton at 509-382-2543 or janae@daytonsd.org. In the event of a school closure due to COVID-19 meals will be available for pick up the day following the closure. Depending on the length of closure, meal delivery sites may be added to central locations in the community.

CEP PROGRAM APPROVED FOR DAYTON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL - Continued for 2020-2021 school year!

Beginning the 2019-2020 school year all students in grades preschool through 5th will receive free breakfast and lunch as part of the Community Eligibility Provision Program or CEP. Dayton qualified for this program by identifying that 40 percent of the student population (in the elementary building) qualified for free meals without the use of household applications (for example those directly certified through SNAP).

The program was authorized by Congress as a part of the Healthy, Hunger‐Free Kids Act of 2010. It was phased in over a period of 3 years, starting with D.C., Illinois, Kentucky, Michigan, New York, Ohio, West Virginia, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, and Massachusetts. The program became available nationwide beginning July 1, 2014.

As part of the program Free & Reduced applications are no longer required to be filled out. However, some of the education programs the district provides are funded from state dollars that require our school to collect household information for all students attending CEP schools.

In order to collect the information, the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) has developed the Family Income Survey. The Family Income Survey is used to capture information and ensure the district/school receives all of the funding it is entitled to for other state funded education programs.

If you have questions or would like more information please contact Food Services Director, Jana Eaton, at 509-382-2543. 

TASTE WASHINGTON 

**TASTE WASHINGTON DAY IS AN ANNUAL CELEBRATION OF WASHINGTON GROWN FOODS SERVED IN SCHOOL MEALS DURING THE FALL HARVEST SEASON. SCHOOLS CONNECT WITH LOCAL FARMS TO MAKE THE MOST OF OUR BOUNTIFUL FALL HARVEST, AND USE TASTE WASHINGTON DAY TO KICK OFF FARM TO SCHOOL MONTH IN OCTOBER. THIS YEAR ON OCTOBER 7, WE WILL BE FEATURING LOCALLY GROWN APPLES. THE FOLLOWING ARE SOME FUN FACTS ABOUT APPLES:

  • Apples are a member of the rose family of plants, along with pears, peaches, plums and cherries.

  • The science of growing apples is called pomology.

  • Apples come in all shades of red, green and yellow.

  • Most apples are still picked by hand.

  • It takes about 36 apples to create one gallon of apple cider.

  • 25 percent of an apple's volume is air; that is why they float.

  • It takes the energy from 50 leaves to produce one apple.

  • A peck of apples weighs 10.5 pounds.

  • A bushel of apples weighs 42 pounds, and will yield 20-24 quarts of applesauce

  • There are more than 2,500 varieties of apples grown in the United States.

  • Apples are a good source of fiber.

  • A large apple tree can take 8 to 10 years to produce it's first fruit, a small tree usually 3 to 5 years.

  • The larges U.S. apple crop was 277.3 million bushels, harvested in 1998.

  • Apple trees can be grown farther north than other fruit trees because they bloom late in spring, minimizing the chance of frost damage.

  • The largest apple to be picked weighed three pounds.

REQUEST FOR SPECIAL DIETARY ACCOMMODATIONS

Federal law and USDA regulation require school nutrition programs to make reasonable modifications to accommodate children with disabilities. Under the law, a disability is an impairment which substantially limits a major life activity, which can include allergies and digestive conditions, but does not include personal diet preferences. 

To request dietary accommodations please have your doctor complete the Request for Special Dietary Accommodations" form and return to the school nurse or Jana Eaton, Food Services Director. If you have questions please call Jana at 509-382-2543.   
Request for special dietary accommodations form

USDA Non Discrimination Statement

In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, gender identity (including gender expression), sexual orientation, disability, age, marital status, family/parental status, income derived from a public assistance program, political beliefs, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity, in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA (not all bases apply to all programs). Remedies and complaint filing deadlines vary by program or incident.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g., Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.) should contact the responsible Agency or USDA's TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TTY) or contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program discrimination complaint, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, AD-3027, found online at How to File a Program Discrimination Complaint and at any USDA office or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

(1) mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250-9410

(2) fax: 202-690-7442: or

(3) email: program.intake@usda.gov

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.